Standards of care at Bodmin Hospital confirmed

Posted by CFT on 24 January 2013 in Our Services

CQC

The Care Quality Commission has today (23 January 2013) published a report confirming the safe staffing levels on Bodmin Hospital’s psychiatric and dementia wards.

The publication of the inspection report comes just eleven days after an erroneous story in the Sunday Telegraph highlighted concerns with staffing levels at 17 hospitals across the country, including Bodmin.

The inspection visit was carried out in September, when CQC inspectors spent four days talking to patients, staff and Trust managers. Comments made by patients who spoke to the CQC inspectors included on patient who said: ‘my key nurse is ‘brilliant’, the best I’ve ever had’. Similarly a carer visiting a ward said ‘the care staff are all very friendly and helpful; the senior staff are excellent. I have absolutely no complaints’.

“I hope confirmation of the safe staffing levels will reassure people locally about the standards of care provided by at Bodmin Hospital,” said Maria Edgcumbe, Associate Director of Inpatient Services.

“Over a year ago, the CQC suggested we could make improvements to our staffing levels and since then we have recruited a significant number of Registered Mental Nurses (RMNs) and Healthcare Assistants.

“In reviewing our staffing requirements, we have created a number of new posts and identified the long term aim of moving to an increased number of shifts, which will further enhance patient care.

“The new appointments allow us to respond very flexibly to individual patient needs – for example, putting additional staff onto a ward if there are patients who require extra one to one time or close observation.

The inspection was part of the routine programme of monitoring undertaken by the Care Quality Commission to ensure essential standards of quality and safety are met. On their September 2012 10 core standards were reviewed. These included respecting and involving people, consent, record keeping and the management of medicines.

The Trust was found to be compliant with all standards inspected. The full inspection report can be viewed at www.cqc.org.uk.

Rebound therapy comes to Cornwall

Posted by CFT on 2 January 2013 in Our Services

Rebound Therapy

Rebound therapy is due to take off in Cornwall thanks to a National Lottery Grant for All, of over £8,000.

Rebound Therapy, which uses a trampoline to provide exercise based therapy to adults with a learning disability, is being made available for the first time in Cornwall.

Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust’s Specialist Learning Disability Physiotherapist Zoë Zaufal, applied for a lottery grant earlier this year and recently learnt of her application’s success.

“This is great news for people with a learning disability in Cornwall. To help introduce rebound therapy, short taster sessions are being offered on 21 December 2012 at the Polkyth Leisure Centre in St Austell between 11 am and 3 pm and Friday 12th April between 11am and 3pm.

“Throughout the taster session, people will experience bouncing in a variety of positions such as lying, sitting, kneeling and standing. After this date, people can book the free therapy sessions on a weekly basis, on Fridays, at Polkyth Leisure Centre in St Austell.”

Although new to Cornwall, rebound therapy was first thought up in 1969 by E G Anderson to describe the use of trampolines to provide exercise and recreation to people with a range of needs.

Because of their physical health, often many people with a learning disability are unable to get onto a trampoline. To overcome this Zoe used the lottery funds to purchase a hoist which will allow more people to benefit.

Rebound therapy has been shown to help improve movement, promote balance and relaxation. It also improves fitness and can enhance communication skills.

“One of the key benefits of rebound therapy is that a person finds a new freedom through using the trampoline. Although the movements are all controlled, the ‘bounce’ allows people to experience different types of movement, this combined with the fun element often means people don’t realise how hard they are working. The value of the process is that a new freedom is found in controlled movement away from gravity’s effect, which can be experienced by anyone irrespective of disability,” explains Zoe.

Priority will be given to people who are unable to access the trampoline independently although anyone who wants to attend should contact Zoe on 01208 79525. Adults with a learning disability who want to take part must be able to get to and from the session and need to be supported by their team of carers.

Views sought on a new model of dementia care

Posted by CFT on 23 November 2012 in Our Services

Dementia Consultation

Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust is asking local people to take part in its public consultation on how to provide dementia care in future. The consultation will run between 21 November 2012 and 22 February 2013.

People can share their views in a number of ways: at one of the public meetings, by letter, email or by completing the feedback form in the consultation document.

Giles Richards, Consultant Psychiatrist in the Trust’s Complex Care and Dementia Services explains, “CFT is consulting with people now to ensure our dementia services are fit for the future.

“The chances of being affected by dementia increase with age. At age 65, approximately one in 20 people have dementia, while this rises to one in four people aged 85 and over. The number of people with dementia is also set to significantly increase in future. With Cornwall’s higher than average number of older people, we need to plan and act now to ensure we change our services to meet this need and have communities which are dementia friendly.

“Early diagnosis, support and investment in primary care services will help ensure more people can live well with dementia in the community. Future services will allow doctors, nurses and other health professionals to provide care, based on the individual’s needs, and those of their carer, as close to home as possible, in line with people’s wishes.”

“Increased diagnosis, more help with the day to day problems presented by the illness, and specialist hospital care when it is needed will all play a part in the delivery of the best dementia care for local people.”

The proposals set out in the consultation document have been informed by the government’s National Dementia Strategy.

The Trust has also talked to GPs and partner organisations to find out what they want from dementia services. Their views and the results of various pilot schemes have informed the Trust’s proposals.

Details of the full proposals can be viewed in the Trust’s Consultation document.

Copies of the consultation proposals are also being made available from GP surgeries, memory cafes, the Trust’s community mental health teams and other key locations. People can also telephone the Trust on 01726 291000 to ask for a copy to be sent to them in the post.

Non-executive Director Appointment

Posted by CFT on 22 November 2012 in About Us

Derek Law

A former social care director with over 39 year’s experience joins the Board of Directors at Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (CFT) this month.

Derek Law MBE, MA, CQSW joins CFT as a Non-executive Director for a period of three years.

Mr Law is a well known and highly respected leader and figure within the care sector. He has had senior management roles in Derbyshire, Bedfordshire and in Cornwall where he was Deputy Director of Social Services.

Derek Law said “It is a real privilege and honour to have been appointed to an NHS Trust so obviously committed to its patients and staff and to providing services of the highest quality. I look forward to joining an excellent board team and to striving hard to contribute positively towards the many challenges the Trust will face over the next three years and beyond.”

“I am delighted to welcome Derek to CFT. His wealth of experience will benefit the people who use the county’s mental health, learning disability and community children’s services. It is a great pleasure to welcome him back to Cornwall,” added Vicky Wood, Chair.

Mr Law is best known as the former Corporate Director of Adult and Community Services with North Yorkshire County Council where, for 7 years until October 2011, he led and managed a workforce of over 3,500 and an annual gross budget of over £210 million. Under Derek’s leadership North Yorkshire gained a national reputation and was officially defined as ‘a good place to grow old’.

Mr Law was awarded the MBE in the 2010 New Years Honours List for exceptional achievement and services in Local Government.

Cornwall’s Apprenticeship Ambassadors host free event

Posted by CFT on 8 November 2012 in Working For Us

Apprentices

Parents, guardians, family members, teachers and people who influence young people in their career choices are invited to meet Cornwall’s Apprenticeship Ambassadors and their former apprentices at a free event on 15 November at 6.00 pm in the Pavillion at the Royal Cornwall Showground in Wadebridge.

Local Apprenticeship Ambassadors include Rick Stein, Pendennis Shipyard Ltd, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust and Cornwall Glass and Glazing Ltd.

Apprenticeships are available to people over the age of 16 who live in England and are not in full-time education. The entry requirements vary and it can take between one and four years to complete an apprenticeship.

Michael Rabone from Rick Stein said, “We've been very impressed with the opportunity that apprenticeship programmes provide. We have been delighted to observe a wide array of participation in terms of age, experience and previous qualifications.

“Apprenticeships offer an opportunity for individuals to develop knowledge and confidence while providing access to a formal qualification that can be delivered in the workplace; we are very pleased to offer long-term and permanent employment opportunities supported with participation in an apprenticeship programme"

Gaining vital work experience, skills and qualifications in a particular career area means that an apprenticeship can be extremely rewarding. Some apprentices choose to use their qualification and experience to gain entry to a degree programme.

Kylie Wickett leads the apprenticeship programme at Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

“I hope local ‘influencers’ will join us to hear firsthand from employers and their apprentices the benefits of participating in an apprenticeship programme. The event culminates with a buffet and demonstrations from local businesses including Rick Stein.”

Nationally, there are over 200 different apprenticeships available providing more than 1,200 job roles. More information can be found at www.apprenticeships.org.uk.

Anyone interested in attending the free event should telephone 01726 873207 or email CFTcareers@cornwall.nhs.uk to book your place.

Cornwall first county in UK to achieve full UNICEF Baby Friendly accreditation

Posted by CFT on 7 September, 2012 in Our Services

UNICEF Baby Friendly

Cornwall’s Psychiatric Liaison services are the first in the south west and one of just six similar services nationally to be accredited with excellence as part of the Psychiatric Liaison Accreditation Service (PLAN).

PLAN is run by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and checks the quality of care provided to patients based against a set of nationally agreed standards.

Based within Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust’s psychiatric liaison team puts mental health specialists onto the general hospital’s wards. The mental health nurses and doctors work closely with the emergency department and wards across the hospital assessing and supporting patients with mental health problems while they are in hospital.

Bob Taylor is the mental health nurse in charge of Cornwall’s service.

“As a psychiatric team working amongst our general health colleagues in RCHT, we are well placed to identify and support people with any kind of mental health problem when they find themselves in hospital.

“As a result we often work with people when they feel at their lowest or most vulnerable. The accreditation process involves patients at all stages, so we were particularly pleased to learn we had been rated as ‘excellent’ as this clearly demonstrates our commitment to high quality patient care.”

In addition to supporting people with existing mental health problems while they are in hospital due to a physical illness or injury, the Liaison Psychiatry Service also helps Royal Cornwall Hospital patients with dementia, patients of the Emergency Department who have self harmed, patients with substance misuse problems and patients who have been diagnosed with a physical illness that may also cause mental health problems.

“I am delighted that the liaison team in Cornwall has been accredited as excellent. They are a well integrated multi-disciplinary team, with strong leadership, and their work with older patients is particularly valued. Their humane and compassionate approach has been highlighted as being impressive,” said Dr Paul Gill, Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist and Chair of the PLAN Accreditation Committee.

Approximately 30 teams around the UK have signed up to the Psychiatric Liaison Accreditation Network to improve the quality of the services they provide. To achieve a rating of excellent, the Cornish team achieved the majority of the quality standards required by the Royal College

First for Cornwall’s psychiatric liaison services

Posted by CFT on 7 September, 2012 in Our Services

Psychiatric Liaison Service

Cornwall’s Psychiatric Liaison services are the first in the south west and one of just six similar services nationally to be accredited with excellence as part of the Psychiatric Liaison Accreditation Service (PLAN).

PLAN is run by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and checks the quality of care provided to patients based against a set of nationally agreed standards.

Based within Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust’s psychiatric liaison team puts mental health specialists onto the general hospital’s wards. The mental health nurses and doctors work closely with the emergency department and wards across the hospital assessing and supporting patients with mental health problems while they are in hospital.

Bob Taylor is the mental health nurse in charge of Cornwall’s service.

“As a psychiatric team working amongst our general health colleagues in RCHT, we are well placed to identify and support people with any kind of mental health problem when they find themselves in hospital.

“As a result we often work with people when they feel at their lowest or most vulnerable. The accreditation process involves patients at all stages, so we were particularly pleased to learn we had been rated as ‘excellent’ as this clearly demonstrates our commitment to high quality patient care.”

In addition to supporting people with existing mental health problems while they are in hospital due to a physical illness or injury, the Liaison Psychiatry Service also helps Royal Cornwall Hospital patients with dementia, patients of the Emergency Department who have self harmed, patients with substance misuse problems and patients who have been diagnosed with a physical illness that may also cause mental health problems.

“I am delighted that the liaison team in Cornwall has been accredited as excellent. They are a well integrated multi-disciplinary team, with strong leadership, and their work with older patients is particularly valued. Their humane and compassionate approach has been highlighted as being impressive,” said Dr Paul Gill, Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist and Chair of the PLAN Accreditation Committee.

Approximately 30 teams around the UK have signed up to the Psychiatric Liaison Accreditation Network to improve the quality of the services they provide. To achieve a rating of excellent, the Cornish team achieved the majority of the quality standards required by the Royal College

Fettle House: Compassionate about our services

Posted by CFT on 7 September, 2012 in Our Services

Fettle House

Service users at Fettle House, the Trust’s rehabilitation inpatient service at Bodmin Hospital, have completed a 14 week ‘Compassionate Mind Training’ group - which has been shown to increase self-soothing and reduce the symptoms of anxiety and depression in group settings.

Compassionate Mind Training was developed by Professor Paul Gilbert, particularly for individuals with high shame and self-criticism, which have been linked to a range of psychological difficulties. The key message is that we all find ourselves here in this life and our circumstances and feelings are not our fault, BUT we can take responsibility for change.

Facilitated by two Trainee Clinical Psychologists, with the support of a Healthcare Assistant, the group was attended by service users who were at various stages of recovery. However, the model can be useful to everyone as it focuses on common humanity rather than difficulties associated with any particular diagnosis.

Through use of imagery and relaxation techniques, group members learned techniques and exercises that aim to stimulate the physiological systems associated with compassion and wellbeing. The group also learned to recognise and challenge self-criticism, and develop self-compassion.

The completion of self-rating scales revealed that the symptoms of anxiety and depression improved, and self-compassion and wellbeing were enhanced in the majority of group members.

Initial feedback indicates that group members valued being part of a group and connecting with others.

“It was just the fact that you could be in a group and share with the same group how you felt if you were feeling down… you could share and you felt comfortable sharing it”

“(It has been helpful) analysing negative thoughts to see if you can respond with compassion.”

They also highlighted changes in the way they approach everyday challenges;
“If you give some thought to what you’re actually doing, it’s often a knee jerk reaction. If you step back a bit and think about it, you might do something differently.”
For more information, please visit the Compassionate Mind Foundation website at www.compassionatemind.co.uk

Publications:
The Compassionate Mind, Paul Gilbert 2010, Constable and Robinson Ltd

£400,000 NHS scheme to improve community safety in Cornwall

Posted by CFT on 21 August, 2012 in Our Services

Community Safety

Cornwall is at the forefront of a new scheme to help people with mental health problems in contact with the Police get help more quickly. Aimed at getting people in frequent contact with the Police, a mental health assessment and treatment when they need it, the scheme will bolster the support available at the county’s custody centres.

Funded as part of national pilot scheme to establish Criminal Justice Diversion Teams, nearly £400,000 is being invested in the county over the next two years.

Three specialist mental health workers have taken up post this month as the county’s Custody and Outreach Team within Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (CFT). Working alongside their colleagues in the police, courts and probation services the mental health workers will be based at the county’s custody centres in Launceston, Newquay and Redruth.

“By working with the police and other partners we’re aiming to pick up mental health need more quickly, reduce vulnerability and make local communities safer. Basing ourselves in the police’s custody centres enables us to work alongside neighbourhood beat officers and teams to prevent vulnerable people from becoming involved in crime in the first place and to offer more effective support to reduce the likelihood of repeat offending.

“Small numbers of people with mental health problems commit crime, but they often have a number of things in common which can help us to identify them and step in early. For people who find themselves in custody, basing staff together makes it easier for joint assessments to be made by the police, health and psychiatric services. Working together in this way allows us to divert people away from the justice system and into health and social care services when it’s appropriate,” explained Paul Bell, manager of the Criminal Justice Diversion Team and CFT's forensic services.

Cornwall is one of just 20 pilots being run nationally before criminal justice diversion teams are set up across the country in response to the Bradley Report.

Published in 2009 the Bradley Report reviewed the experiences of people with mental health problems and learning disabilities in the justice system. It made 82 recommendations aimed at reducing repeat offending, detentions and court appearances.

The Government green paper ‘Breaking the Cycle’ acknowledges the criminal justice system is not always the best place to manage the problems of less serious offenders particularly when the offending is linked to their mental health problems.

King’s College London, Devon and Cornwall Police, Cornwall Foundation Trust and the Institute of Health And Communities at Plymouth University are currently researching the area of mental health and policing, which will help to assess the impact of the scheme particularly looking at the benefits for those who are supported by the service and the appropriate quality standards. The Custody and Outreach Service will contribute to the evaluation of similar services nationally. The findings will inform the future of diversion services when they are implemented nationally.

Hospitals score top marks for privacy and dignity

Posted by CFT on 10 August, 2012 in Join Us

Hospitals score top marks for privacy and dignity

Bodmin Hospital and Longreach House in Redruth have both received top marks for the privacy and dignity of patients.

The annual assessments, co-ordinated by the National Patient Safety Agency, provide a snap shot of non clinical care covering areas from cleanliness and signage to the quality and availability of food and drink. Hospitals are rated in three categories – with scores ranging from ‘excellent’ to ‘unacceptable’.

When assessing privacy and dignity, the assessors consider the confidentiality of patient information, visiting hours, assistance with personal care, appropriate patient clothing and ability to follow usual faith practices.

Maria Edgcumbe, Acting Associate Director of Inpatient Services said: “Having both hospitals assessed with the highest rating is great news for Cornish patients. PEAT results assess areas which, although aren’t clinical, play a really important part in the patient’s experience for example, choice of food, cleanliness of bed linen, and car parking. I’d like to thank all the staff who ensure we achieve these high standards.”

Longreach House, Redruth received an excellent for its environment and good for its food. Bodmin Hospital received a rating of good for its environment and food.

PEAT assessments were undertaken between January and March this year.

Cornish dementia care celebrated nationally

Posted by CFT on 20 July, 2012 in Join Us

Care Integration Awards

An award to celebrate excellence in patient care has been won by the NHS in Cornwall.

People with dementia who are at the end of their life can be assured of dignity and respect thanks to a model of care developed by clinicians in Cornwall.

The NHS scheme was the winning entry in the dementia care category of the prestigious Care Integration Awards 2012. The awards were created by the Nursing Times and Health Service Journal to celebrate excellence in patient care.

The model of care has been created and provided by Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, NHS Cornwall and Isles of Scilly, GPs, the Peninsula Deanery, Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust and the Alzheimer’s Society.

Cornwall’s approach recognises the support given to the families of people with dementia in planning their last days. By talking through the options in a ‘best interest’ planning meeting, it allows care to be planned and for unnecessary hospital admissions to be avoided.

“Families really appreciate being involved in developing a care plan for their loved one so that they understand what to expect and know they will be helped to live their last days with dignity,” said Kate Mitchell, Joint Dementia

“It’s a really sensitive, yet crucial, area of work and to have it recognised nationally through the Care Integration Awards is a real endorsement of its value in improving care.”

Carol Williams, Director of Nursing for the Primary Care Trust, said: “I am absolutely thrilled for the dementia team; they fully deserve this award in driving forward this initiative with care homes. It is about ensuring that the end stages of dementia are fully understood by everyone involved, so that people are able to die peacefully and with dignity.

“We are fully supported by the 40 GP practices involved with the care pathway and families can be assured that it fits fully with the legal framework for those who lack mental capacity.

“It’s already having significant results in the 11 homes that have so far adopted the care pathway, with no hospital admissions for anyone who has had a ‘best interest’ planning meeting. Our aim now is to ensure this is rolled out to many more homes providing dementia care.”

Julie Anderson who manages a community dementia team said “CFT’s dementia liaison team are delighted to have been able to provide this type of care and we’re pleased to be rolling this out across the county. As a result of our success in these awards we will be talking to the Department of Health about how this could be rolled out nationally.

“In addition, the Chief Executive of the Alzheimer’s Society will visit CFT to meet the staff delivering the pathway and celebrate Cornwall’s leading dementia care services.”

‘Best interest’ meetings involve families and staff, who use a toolkit to work through all aspects of end of life and palliative care and best practice, research and information to allow informed decisions to be made.

A 2009 national audit of care home acute admissions showed that 27 percent of people with dementia admitted from their nursing home died in hospital. The high number of palliative admissions highlighted a poor understanding of the end stage of dementia, a lack of dignity for the patient and a failure to then provide integrated end of life care and treatment. People with dementia were rarely included on the best practice Liverpool Care Pathway and received inadequate pain relief.

Bev Chapman, Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust Nurse Clinical Lead for dementia, said: “This award is an accolade for everyone who has been involved in this initiative - we can’t do this work without them or the understanding of the families involved. “End stage dementia patients don’t have the ability to speak for themselves but can be reassured, from this work, that their loved ones are fully involved in deciding what is best for them at every step of the journey.

“Any promotion of this initiative nationally through these awards can only be beneficial in encouraging other care homes to think about adopting this rewarding initiative.”

Memorial Gift launches Reminiscence Box Fund

Posted by CFT on 13 June, 2012 in Join Us

Reminiscence Box

When Bernard Oakes of Saltash died unexpectedly in May, his widow Janet decided to honour his memory with a special gift to the Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust Charitable Fund. Bernard had served for 2 years as a Governor of the Trust, where he had worked closely with the Charitable Fund to support community projects which improve mental health and tackle stigma.

“I want to use the money Bernard’s friends and family donated in his memory to stimulate the memories of people with dementia by buying Reminiscence Boxes. Each box will be used by the Trust’s specialist community teams to provide individual treatment at home for people with dementia, as well as support for the family members who care for them”, Janet said.

For people living with dementia – and their carers – days are often distressing, repetitive and very long. A Reminiscence Box, filled with simple items – such as a bar of Sunlight soap, ‘old’ money, marbles, a darning mushroom, liquorice sticks, nappy pins – will stimulate those memories which remain intact.

Vicky Wood, Chair of Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust explained, “Everyday, throughout Cornwall, our Trust fields specialist nurses, occupational therapists and health care assistants who will use each Reminiscence Box again and again. At a cost of just £80, a Reminiscence Box will help people with dementia and their carers share memories as equals and encourage them to create a box of their own.”

“People who want to help us enhance the quality of life for people with dementia in Cornwall may donate to our registered charity by visiting www.cornwallfoundationtrust.nhs.uk or telephoning Stephen Woodard on 01726 291026.”